WHAT IS YOUR GPF?

Word games have always been popular – crossword puzzles, Jumbles, acrostics, Wheel of Fortune and now, Words with Friends. So, what is your GPF? If you know what GPF means, you win 12 rolls of toilet paper! If you didn’t know what it means, you get um, a catalog.

Your water bill is a total of your water usage for bathing, washing clothes, dish washing (whether by hand or dishwasher), hand washing, flushing toilets, and outside work such as watering your lawn and plants, and washing your vehicles. Oh, and don’t forget kids playing in the sprinkler or filling up swimming pools. Of that list, which one uses the most water? Bathing? Washing clothes? Outside work? Actually, it is the same thing for almost every household. According to the EPA, flushing our toilets accounts for nearly 20% (some say higher) of the total water used in our homes.

Knowing the GPF could help greatly lower your water bill. GPF means ‘gallons per flush. Frankly, most oF us aren’t too concerned with the GPF – we just want to make sure that what is in the bowl, leaves the bowl.

Most toilets made prior to 1970 used over 6 gallons of water in a single flush – a 6.0 GPF. Due to droughts, water shortages, etc, some states began setting water usage standards. In 1978 California enacted legislation that set a 3.5 GPF standard for toilets. Other state soon followed California’s lead. In 1994 the standard was lowered to 1.6 GPF and now, in California, beginning January, 2014, the standard has been lowered to a 1.28 GPF in all newly built homes and in any home being remodeled. As before, once California made their move, others were quick to follow. The lowered water use sounded wonderful; however, consumers were quick to complain. Why? Instead of flushing once, consumers were flushing their toilets multiple times, thus negating any savings on their water bills.   Pressure began to mount on the manufacturers from consumers and legislatures to modify and redesign their toilets to provide what the consumer wanted – one flush per use. Further pressure then came from the EPA when it developed its ‘Water Sense’ program. Under this program, all toilets wanting to earn the ‘Water Sense’ label must have a 1.29 GPF. Manufacturers heard them loud clear, and they responded.

Today you can find a list of over 2000 different toilets that have earned the ‘Water Sense’ label. To earn the label, a toilet is tested by an independent agency using the MaP Testing program. (see prior blog – Not All Toilets Are Created Equal) The testing is voluntary and the manufacturers pay for the testing themselves. There is pressure from all sides for the manufacturers to have their toilets tested.

Do ‘Water Sense’ toilets cost more? Yes, they can; however, with rebate programs that have been offered in some states and the savings on the water bill the extra cost can be recouped in a few years.

If your family is considering replacing a toilet or toilets, may we suggest that you go to the EPA web site to look at the list of toilets (and other plumbing fixtures) that have earned the ‘Water Sense’ label. When shopping, be sure and look for the ‘Water Sense’ label on the product you are considering and choose wisely for the sake of your wallet.   Contact Aaron Kramer Plumbing for further information on ‘Water Sense’ toilets or for any of your plumbing needs such as toilets, faucets, water heaters, garbage disposals, or pipe leaks. (937-898-0008) (Oh, and if you knew what GPF meant, send us your mane and address for your 12 rolls of toilet paper! Quality not guaranteed; use at your own risk.)

 

Written by Bruce Kramer