Tag Archives: exterior faucet

DO’S, DON’TS, NEVERS, AND CHUCKLES

DO’S, DON’TS, NEVERS AND CHUCKLES –

First Edition

Just a few random thoughts from your plumber’s secretary.

(If we aren’t your plumber, you don’t have to read this; but, on second thought, maybe your plumber doesn’t offer such enlightening information. So, go ahead and read it.)

  1. Do disconnect your hose in late fall from the exterior faucet to prevent freezing and the potential bursting of the piping. If you don’t, your insurance company will love the business.
  1. Never put your hand inside a disposal that has the power connected to it. Fingers are a necessity.
  1. Don’t attempt a DIY repair unless you know exactly what you are doing.  The initial repair will probably now cost more to fix than in the beginning.  Thank you for your business!
  1. Don’t pour drain cleaners into any drains. When plunged, some of the remaining acid could be pulled out of the drain and onto your skin or the plumber’s.  Ouch!
  1. Don’t crank harder on a faucet to get it to stop dripping. You may be left holding a faucet handle and now you have more to deal with than a drip.

With sincerity and a few chuckles,

The Plumber’s Secretary

By the way, look for future editions of ‘Do’s, Don’ts, Nevers, and Chuckles’ from the ‘enlightened’ plumber’s secretary!

 

PRACTICE WHAT YOU PREACH!

PRACTICE WHAT YOU PREACH!

Dear Friends and Neighbors,

Too early, much too early, cold, very cold temperatures have arrived. The cold temperatures have ended the growing season of my nine, beautiful plants on our deck, and the growing season of our vincas out front that valiantly tried to brave the cold and tried to continue blooming.  But alas, all of them have succumbed to the cold.

Watering the nine plants on our deck was not easy. We either had to haul water up the steps outside or haul water through the house. Not fun. The solution was to have our son install a spigot for the deck, running it from the exterior faucet up to the deck. Problem solved, and it was wonderful! No hauling water!

Can you get a feel for where this is going?

On a trip to the shed in the backyard we found water spewing from the exterior faucet, and the backyard flooded from the house to the shed. Thankfully all the water was in the backyard, and not in the house. The water line from the exterior faucet to the deck had frozen and come apart at the connection. Now read the title of the blog again; go ahead, you may laugh, with my permission. Did my boss (who is a plumber) and my son both warn us to disconnect this water line to the deck?  Of course! I can just hear it – you’re laughing again and shaking your head.  Do you know how embarrassing this is?

So, I will warn you again, dear friends and neighbors,

DISCONNECT THOSE HOSES, DRAIN THOSE WATER LINES, AND TURN OFF THE SHUT OFF VALVE ON THE EXTERIOR FAUCET WATER LINE!

In addition to the exterior faucet there may be other things that need your attention in the house as these cold temperatures set in. Perhaps you have some drafty windows that need to be winterized, and when was the last time the gas furnace had a check-up? Drafty windows will drive up your heating bill, and that gas furnace could put out carbon monoxide (the silent killer) that would not just make your family sick, but could and has caused deaths.

We suggest you run through our check list and make sure your home is ready for these cold temperatures:

1. Exterior faucet is turned off completely and there is no dripping.

2. Hose is detached and stored properly.

3.  Shut off valve on the water line to the exterior faucet is in the ‘off’ position.  Don’t have a shut off valve for the exterior faucet? Give us a call.

4.  Doors and windows have been winterized.

5.  Gas furnace has had a check-up.

6.  Batteries in the smoke detectors and carbon monoxide detectors have been checked and replaced, if necessary.

7.  Carbon monoxide detectors have not only been purchased, but installed.

Enjoy the cozy fires and blankets, and those big mugs of coffee or hot chocolate. Be safe, cozy, and warm this winter – not sorry.

From the secretary at Aaron Kramer Plumbing,

Ruthanne

 

 

 

 

WHAT SHAPE IS YOUR ‘SILLCOCK’ IN?

My what?  My sillcock?  You probably know it as a hose bib, exterior faucet, or outside spigot.  As to the ‘shape’ of your faucet, we are referring to its condition.  Your home is probably the most important asset you own, and minor plumbing issues can turn into major issues if not caught immediately.

Temperatures are warming up (THANKFULLY!) and in the next few months your exterior faucet is going to get quite a work out.  Very soon, if not already, many of you are going to be out preparing flower beds and/or gardens for planting, as well as washing the family vehicle.  Having an exterior faucet in working order will be a must.

Leaving your hose connected during the winter could cause damage to your faucet.  A leaking exterior faucet will increase  your water bill, and if it leaks in the house, the damage done could be extensive.

We would like to suggest that when you turn the faucet on, watch for leaks from the body or handle, and also any leaking from visible piping.  We also recommend that  you check the inside of the house – the basement, under the kitchen sink – any place where the water line for the exterior faucet ties in.  Without checking inside, water could be leaking for sometime before it is found.

To protect your home this next winter, we recommend that you do the following:

1.  Disconnect the hose and store it in the garage.

2.  Turn off the shut off valve on the water line to the exterior faucet.  (If there is no shut off valve, we recommend that you have one installed.)

3.  Purchase a foam cover for the faucet from a home center and put it over the faucet.  This will insulate it and hopefully prevent freezing.

Terms such as ‘sillcock’ may seem out-of-date, but we need to stay on top of things in our homes to keep them up-to-date and in good working order.  Give Aaron Kramer Plumbing a call at the first sign of any issues with your exterior faucet.  Please call us today at 937-898-0008.